Mango wood, the sustainable option

using wood to add warmth to your home is so much easier than painting your walls a ludicrous colour that you just know you’re going to hate next year. wood is naturally beautiful, timeless and fits with practically any interior style!

which wood do you chose? mango wood is one of my favourites. it has soft, creamy texture when it’s been sanded down and is usually light golden in colour; but it isn’t just the appearance of this wood that has me fascinated. mango wood is becoming increasingly known as one of the more eco-friendly woods available.

not surprisingly, mango wood comes from the mango fruit tree, and when the tree reaches around 20 years old it becomes less efficient at producing fruit. in the past, when the mango trees reached it’s maturity they were left to rot or were often burnt for fuel which omits excess CO2. now this wood is being used for everything, from furniture to kitchen utensils, preventing danger to animals, wildlife and reduces pollution!

the wood is dense and takes to staining and waxing very easily, making it a beautiful alternative material for furniture. because of this, the use of mango wood is saving the more endangered woods such as teak from being harvested.

Mango wood, the sustainable option - Moodboard | A Living Diary

1 – marble and mango wood coat hooks from john lewis
2 – small mango wood storage box/crate from pastel lane
3 – walur mango wood chopping board from urbanara
4 – nimri mango wood engraved serving board from urbanara
5 – chip & dip plate with mango wood bowl from john lewis
6 – off white iron and mango wood smithy stool from toast
7 – dakota mango cube nest from casabella furniture

4 Comments

  1. Sofia says:

    Beautiful. i personally love the look of wood in general, so it’s great to know that mango is a sustainable option. it looks so rich! thanks so much for sharing.

    • After seeing a lot of Japanese people, one would be able to see, Japanese phenotype doesn’t resemble northern Asians, but rather southern Chinese and some southeast Asians. How can we explain this? Is it because they do not have the C3-M217, because this haplogroup occurs at very low frequencies (a mere 1-2%) among Japanese. After seeing a lot of Koreans, they have a predominantly northern Asian phenotype, and the common saying “Why do Koreans look so Mongolian?”. Could this be explained by moderately high frequencies of C3-M217 and a northern origin of the Korean mtDNA?

    • That’s a nicely made answer to a challenging question

    • If I communicated I could thank you enough for this, I’d be lying.

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